100 THOUSAND SOLAR LANTERNS PROJECT Vol.5

Feature Story

Panasonic Launches the 100 Thousand Solar Lanterns Project Website

Panasonic aims to contribute to the progress and development of societies in developing and emerging countries through donating a total of 100,000 solar LED lanterns to people living in areas without electricity by 2018, the 100th anniversary of the company's founding. On the website, project members will report on the current conditions and issues in regions without electricity as well as on the progress of the project.

Panasonic aims to contribute to the progress and development of societies in developing and emerging countries through donating a total of 100,000 solar LED lanterns to people living in areas without electricity by 2018, the 100th anniversary of the company's founding. On the website, project members will report on the current conditions and issues in regions without electricity as well as on the progress of the project.

The recipients of the solar lanterns are NPOs/NGOs and international organizations working in the main non-electrified regions of Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. In 2013, so far, Panasonic donated a total of 10,000 compact solar lights--5,000 to India, 3,000 to Myanmar, and 2,000 to refugee camps in Kenya.

This website will report on the current conditions and issues in regions without electricity and the progress of the project as experienced first-hand by our project members through their conversations with local people they meet on site visits. The website consists of the following three sections.

  • Field Reports
    Our project members visit the project areas to observe the circumstances in which solar lanterns are used and listen directly to the beneficiaries. Here they report on the local situation.
  • Our Partners
    NPOs/NGOs, international organizations and other partners to which we donate solar lanterns talk with project members on the challenges people face in off-grid areas and future possibilities for the project.
  • Photo Gallery
    Photographic reports on how solar lanterns are used in the lives of the people in areas without electricity.

100 THOUSAND SOLAR LANTERNS PROJECT

Currently, there are about 1.32 billion people worldwide living without electricity, mainly in developing countries in Asia and Africa. Many homes in these regions use kerosene lamps for lighting, but the smoke released by them is harmful to human health. Since they do not provide sufficient light, activities of people are significantly restricted at night. The lack of electric light in these regions results in challenges in the areas of healthcare, education and the economy.

In December, 2013, Panasonic is releasing the new Solar Lantern with Charger Function, developed in response to local needs, and this new model will be used for donation. Panasonic will continue to promote initiatives that contribute to the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for a better world and a better way of life.
[Panasonic to Release Solar LED Lantern for People Living in Areas Without Electricity]

  • What is "100 THOUSAND SOLAR LANTERNS PROJECT"

Through this website, we will share the progress of this project and other related information. Updates are also published on Panasonic's social media accounts.

Follow Us:

Related Links:

Translate this page

  • YouTube
  • Picasa
  • Feed

Translation Help?

This page brings together news about Panasonic’s activities around the world. Use the Google Translate service at the top of the page to read articles written in languages other than your own. Other services listed below are also available. N.B. Panasonic does not guarantee the accuracy, dependability, or utility of such translations, or the compatibility of the provided translation service with your internet viewing environment.

Translation Services - Yahoo Babel Fish>> - Applied Languages>>

Notes

The content in this website is accurate at the time of publication but may be subject to change without notice. Please note therefore that these documents may not always contain the most up-to-date information.